Comparing Law Degrees at Universities in NSW

So you’ve decided to study law. But what law degree, at which university, is the right one for you? We’ve done some research on your behalf, and spoken to current law students from all major law schools in New South Wales. We've got the low-down on their stand-out features, how subjects are taught and examined, what students loved about their degrees and what could have been better. This article compares and contrasts law degrees in NSW so you can decide which one fits you best.

Macquarie University


Stand-out features:

  • Heavy focus on elective law units, available in final 2 years of combined degree
  • Participation and Community Engagement (PACE) incorporating compulsory practical units into study program
  • Vibrant law students society

2013 ATAR cut-off: 96.90 and above (varies according to combined degree chosen).

The Macquarie law degree is done as a combined degree with one of the following other bachelor degrees: Arts, Arts (Media), Arts (Psychology), Social Science, Education, International Studies, Commerce, Commerce (Professional Accounting), Applied Finance, Business Administration, Science, Environment Engineering; or IT.

Teaching format: Most subjects have 1 x two-hour lecture and 1 x tutorial per week (though this can vary according to the course convenor’s [i.e. the person from the university who organises the subject] preferences).

Assessment: Assessment requirements vary across subjects. The majority of subjects have a mark for participation during tutorials (10%), a mid-semester assignment (10-15%), and a final exam or essay that makes up the bulk of the subject mark.

Subjects and credit points: The university requires students to complete enough subjects to reach a total of 72 credit points in order to graduate from the Bachelor of Laws. Each subject offered in the Macquarie University Bachelor of Law is worth 3 credit points. These subjects are drawn from:

15 compulsory units (45 credit points) made up of: Foundations of Law; Criminal Justice and Procedure; Law, Lawyers and Society; Contracts; Jurisprudence; Torts; Constitutional Law and Administration I & II; Property in Law and Equity I & II; International Law; Business Organisations; Remedies; Litigation; Professional and Community Engagement.

9 elective units (27 credit points) chosen from: International Human Rights Law; Law of International Organisations; International Trade & Finance, European Law & Institutions; Jessup International Law Moot; Conflict of Laws; Law of the Sea; War Law; International Dispute Settlement; Environmental Law; International Environmental Law; Climate Change & Energy Law; Issues in International Heritage & Conservation Law; Local Government & Planning Law; Consumer & Competition Law; Foundations of Commercial Law; Modern Corporate Governance; Taxation; Intellectual Property Law; Information Technology Law; Family Law; Succession; Health Law & Ethics; Advanced Torts; Labour Law; Law & Religion; Human Rights and Moral Dilemmas; Media Law; Discrimination and the Law; Dispute Management & Resolution; Indigenous Peoples & the Law; Access to Justice Placement Program; Politics and the Constitution; Advanced Administrative Law; and Advanced Legal Research Project.

Exchange opportunities: Law students may undergo exchanges to a number of international universities that offer legal studies programs. 

Degree structure: 5 years full-time in conjunction with a second undergraduate degree.

Year 1:
Semester One: 3 subjects from other degree + 1 core law subject
Semester Two: 3 subjects from other degree + 1 core law subject

Year 2:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects
Semester Two: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects

Year 3:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subject
Semester Two: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects

Year 4:
Semester One: 1 core law subject + 3 elective law subjects
Semester Two: 1 core law subject + 3 elective law subjects

Year 5:
Semester One: 1 core law subject + 2 elective law subjects
Semester Two: 1 core law subject + 2 elective law subjects

Degree Overview: Having just celebrated its 40th anniversary, the Law Faculty of Macquarie University is one of the longer standing law schools in New South Wales and its reputation continues to grow. Particularly in recent years, the faculty has attracted some of Australia’s most respected academics in the field.

Reflecting on her time as a law student at Macquarie, fifth year student Hannah identifies passionate and accomplished lecturers and tutors as the greatest contributors to her enjoyment of her degree.

‘There are several great lecturers at Macquarie Law School, particularly for Contract and Business Law subjects. The faculty also offers a special summer seminar in International Criminal Law, taught by incredible lecturers with amazing experience – two prosecutors from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and also the head of the forensic team on several UN mass grave sites.’

One unique feature of the Macquarie University law degree is the Participation and Community Engagement (PACE) program, which integrates compulsory practical, in-field units into the study program. Students are encouraged to participate in a range of professional activities, such as internships in commercial law firms, research projects under the supervision of academic lawyers, or volunteer with a legal not-for-profit organisation that provides access to lawyers and justice for disadvantaged members of the community. There are also opportunities for students to gain work experience through the Macquarie Law Centre, positioning them nicely for future employment.

The Macquarie University Law Society (MULS) offers a lively co-curricular and social program, with activities such as competitions that cater to more academically-minded students, as well as law balls and social events for those students who need to blow off some steam after too much time spent in the library.

www.law.mq.edu.au/home/
 

The University of New South Wales


Stand-out features:

  • Streamlined teaching format of 2 seminars per week
  • Electives available in final year only
  • Legal research centres providing opportunity for clinical legal training
  • Vibrant law students society

2013 ATAR cut-off: 99.65

The UNSW law degree is done as a combined degree with one of the following other bachelor degrees: Arts, Art Theory, Commerce, Computer Science, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Economics, Engineering, International Studies, Media, Planning, Science, Advanced Maths, Advanced Science, Social Work, or Social Research and Policy.

Teaching format: All subjects have 2 x two-hour seminars per week, on either a Monday and Thursday, or Tuesday and Friday.

Assessment: Assessment requirements vary across subjects. The majority of subjects involve a mark for participation during seminars (10-20%), one mid-semester assignment (30%-40%) and one end of semester open-book exam (40%-60%).

Subjects and credit points: While it may vary depending on the student's chosen combined degree, the university generally requires students to complete enough subjects to reach a total of 144 credit points in order to graduate from the Bachelor of Laws. Most subjects offered in the UNSW Bachelor of Law are worth 6 credit points (though some subjects with less content such as Legal Research are worth 2). These subjects are drawn from:

19 compulsory units (102 credit points) made up of: Introducing Law & Justice; Torts; Principles of Public Law; Criminal Justice; Principles of Private Law; Defining Crime; Contracts; Administrative Law; Equity & Trusts; Lawyers, Ethics & Justice; Land Law; Resolving Civil Disputes; Federal Constitutional Law; Business Associations; Court Process, Evidence & Proof; Law & Practice in a Global Context; Law & Social Theory/Legal Theory/Theories of Law & Justice.

7 elective units (42 credit points) chosen from an extensive list available here: http://www.law.unsw.edu.au/courses/undergraduate/5

Exchange opportunities: Law students may undergo exchanges to a number of international universities that offer legal studies programs. The competitiveness of the exchange opportunity depends on the popularity of the student’s desired overseas university, with some exchange destinations being in particularly high demand. Students also have the opportunity to attend winter and summer schools at overseas universities.

Degree structure: 5 years full-time in conjunction with a second undergraduate degree. While the structure varies significantly depending on the student’s chosen combined degree, a typical degree structure involves:

Year 1:
Semester One: 3 subjects from other degree + 1 core law subject
Semester Two: 3 subjects from other degree + 1 core law subject

Year 2:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects
Semester Two: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects

Year 3:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subject
Semester Two: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects

Year 4:
Semester One: 3 core law subjects + 1 subject from other degree
Semester Two: 3 core law subjects + 1 subject from other degree

Year 5:
Semester One: 1 prescribed elective law subject + 3 elective law subjects of student’s choice
Semester Two: 4 elective law subjects of student’s choice

Degree Overview: The Faculty of Law at the University of New South Wales has traditionally been regarded as one of Sydney’s most prestigious law degrees. Its popularity is reflected in the high entrance requirement, the only law degree other than the University of Sydney’s with an ATAR cut-off over 99.

Law subjects at the University of New South Wales are uniquely structured, with each subject taught in two seminars per week, instead of the conventional lecture/tutorial scheme. This structure aims to facilitate student participation and interactive learning - though some students have remarked that seminars can sometimes be quite full, perhaps frustrating this goal. Another advantage of this structure is that classes can be held within two days, so that students will only have law units on either a Monday and Thursday, or a Tuesday and Friday, leaving time in the week for part-time work or study. Fifth year student Daniel, undergoing an International Studies/Law degree, says,

'Studying at UNSW law has been a fantastic all-round experience. Not only are the course materials both challenging and interesting, they are taught by a wide-range of academics with different experiences of the profession – from corporate lawyers to leading members of the Bar, and former members of the judiciary. The comparatively small class sizes means there are plenty of opportunities to engage in discussion and debate over the issues – you are certainly taught to think about the law, not just to learn the law.'

The University of New South Wales is also notable for its legal research, advocacy and education centres, which provide opportunities for clinical legal education and valuable practical internships that will assist students in their search for future employment. Included in the list of Centres is the reputed Australasian Legal Information Institute (AustLII), the Australian Human Rights Institute, the Centre for International Finance and Regulation, and the Cyberspace Law and Policy Centre, among others.

The University of New South Wales Law Society maintains a dynamic social and co-curricular program. Fifth year student Abbey says,

‘the social aspect of law at UNSW is pretty amazing. The law society provide parties and social functions which are entertaining, but this is balanced by the many seminars and lectures given by identities in the legal community. While at times some students are competitive, UNSW has a very laid back atmosphere and on the whole students and staff are interesting, engaged, supportive and lots of fun.’

www.law.unsw.edu.au/
 

The University of Sydney


Stand-out features:

  • Electives available in final year only
  • Heavy weighting on exams (though written assignments are being increasingly set for assessment)
  • Traditionally strong academic and research focus
  • Vibrant law students society

2013 ATAR cut-off: 99.70

The Sydney University law degree is done as a combined degree with one of the following other bachelor degrees: Arts; Arts (Media and Communications); International and Global Studies; Commerce; Economics; Engineering; Information Technology; Political, Economic and Social Sciences and; Science.

Teaching format: Either 2 x 2 hour lecture + 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week; or 2 x 2 hour interactive seminars per week (depending on subject).

Assessment: Assessment requirements vary across subjects. The majority of subjects in the first, second, and third years are assessed by a mid-semester assignment (essay or problem-based question) (usually 30%), a final exam that is usually open-book depending on the persuasion of the person organising the course (usually 60%) and a tutorial participation mark (10%). Fourth and fifth year subjects often take the same format, but some are assessed by open-book exams only, with no written assignments.

Subjects and credit points: The university requires students to complete enough subjects to reach a total of 144 credit points in order to graduate from the Bachelor of Laws. Each subject offered in the University of Sydney Bachelor of Law is worth 6 credit points. These subjects are drawn from:

16 compulsory units (96 credit points) made up of: Foundations of Law; Legal Research 1-2; Torts; Contracts; Civil and Criminal Procedure; Criminal Law; Public International Law; Public Law; Torts and Contracts 2; Administrative Law; Federal and Constitutional Law; Introduction to Property and Commercial Law; The Legal Profession; Corporations Law; Equity; Evidence and; Real Property.

8 elective units (48 credit points) chosen from an extensive list available here: http://sydney.edu.au/law/cstudent/undergrad/docs_pdfs/2013_LLBUoS_descriptions.pdf

Exchange opportunities: Law exchanges are available to students in their fifth year of a combined degree, to countries including Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Finland, Israel, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Netherlands, Singapore, United Kingdom, United States. Positions are limited and therefore highly competitive. Students also have the opportunity to attend Winter and Summer schools at overseas universities.

Degree structure: 5 years full-time in conjunction with a second undergraduate degree.

The degree structure may vary if students undergo combined degrees of a longer duration, but the general structure for most combined law degrees involves:

Year 1:
Semester One: 3 subjects from other degree + 1 core law subject
Semester Two: 3 subjects from other degree + 1 law subject

Year 2:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects
Semester Two: 3 subjects from other degree + 1 core law subject

Year 3:
Semester One: 3 subjects from other degree + 1 core law subject
Semester Two: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects

Year 4:
Semester One: 4 core law subjects
Semester Two: 4 core law subjects

Year 5:
Semester One: 4 elective law subjects
Semester Two: 4 elective law subjects

Degree overview: The Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney has cultivated a prestigious reputation over the years – bolstered by its notoriously high entrance requirements – and with a history that dates back to 1855, it has had a long time to do so. Accordingly, the law faculty at Sydney University attracts lecturers and professors with impressive legal experience, and its graduates are typically well-respected by employers in law firms and the wider profession. A large portion of students participate in clerkship programs and gain graduate positions. Fourth year student Ben says,

‘What I like most about Sydney Law is the competition. The dynamic of students at the law school creates a stimulating and competitive environment that also provides motivation and nourishment.’

As a faculty steeped in tradition, this degree has a more academic focus than some of its counter parts at universities that place a greater emphasis on practical skills. For example, while there is a dynamic mooting competition (i.e. mock-trials) organized by the student-run Sydney University Law Society (SULS), there are no formal mooting requirements encompassed within the degree’s core subjects. Problem-based questions requiring students to apply their academic knowledge in a practical way is, however, the most common form of assessment in this degree, with academic essays reserved for particular subjects such as International Law and the Federal Constitution.

Outside of the classroom, the law student society coordinates a vibrant social and co-curricular program. Activities range from regular social events to opportunities in volunteering, careers workshops, mooting and negotiations competitions and student-developed publications. For fourth year Arts/Law student Melissa, the student society is,

‘the number one reason I have stuck at my law degree when assessments have gotten the better of me, or I’ve been battling with a particularly dry law subject. Not only because of the lively social environment, but the co-curricular stuff I have been involved in has made coming to uni a lot more exciting than simply turning up to lectures.’

The Sydney University Law Faculty also provides ample opportunities for students to participate in overseas study. As well as its exchange programs, the faculty offers summer and winter school subjects across China, Japan and South East Asia, an international law subject on location in the Himalayas, and pathways for high-performing students to study at Oxford.   

sydney.edu.au/law/

The University of Technology, Sydney


Stand-out features:

  • Often 3 subjects per semester (rather than the standard 4), worth more credit points
  • Strong focus on practical skills
  • Study program involves (comparatively) small number of elective units
  • Practical Legal Training option incorporated into study program
  • Available to undergraduates as a stand-alone degree

2013 ATAR cut-off: 97.05 (may vary according to combined degree choice)
If undertaken as a combined degree, the Bachelor of Law can be combined with: Business, Engineering, Communication, Science, Information Technology, or International Studies.
Teaching format: Most subjects have 1 x 2 hour lecture + 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week. Some subjects have 2 x 1-2 hour seminars per week, or 1 x 3 hour seminar per week.

Assessment: Assessment requirements vary across subjects. All subjects have a mid-semester exam or assignment (usually worth 40%) and a final exam that is usually open-book (usually worth 50%). Most subjects also have a mark for participation during tutorials (usually 10%). Very occasionally, a subject will consist entirely of take-home assessments (either assignments or take-home exams due within a few days of their release).

Subjects and credit points: The university requires students to complete enough subjects to reach a total of 144 credit points in order to graduate from the Bachelor of Laws. The credit points allocated to subjects offered in the University of Technology's Bachelor of Law varies between 6 and 8 credit points. These subjects are drawn from:

17 compulsory units (102 credit points) made up of: Perspectives on Law; Legal Method and Research; Criminal Law; Torts; Contracts; Australian Constitutional Law; Real Property; Commercial Law; Equity and Trusts; Corporate Law; Administrative Law; Evidence and Criminal Procedure; Civil Litigation; and Ethics and Professional Conduct.

5 - 7 elective units (42 credit points chosen from the range of elective subjects; OR 30 credit points chosen from the range of elective subjects + 12 credit points of Practical Legal Training). Subject availability varies across semesters. The selection for 2013 and 2014 is available here: http://www.law.uts.edu.au/subjects/index.html 

Exchange opportunities: UTS has around 70 partnerships with international universities spread across Europe, Asia, North, Central and South America, many of which offer law exchanges.

Degree Structure: 4 years full-time as a stand-alone degree; 5 years full-time in conjunction with a second bachelor degree.

The structure varies significantly depending on the student’s combined degree. However, a typical structure of a 5 year combined degree involves:

Year 1:
Semester One: 4 subjects from other degree
Semester Two: 1 subject from other degree + 2 core law subjects

Year 2:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects
Semester Two: 1 subject from other degree + 2 core law subjects

Year 3:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects
Semester Two: 1 subject from other degree + 2 core law subjects

Year 4:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 core law subjects
Semester Two: 2 subjects from other degree + 2 elective law subjects

Year 5:
Semester One: 2 subjects from other degree + 1 core law subject + 1 law elective subject
Semester Two: 4 law elective subjects

Degree overview: The University of Technology, Sydney has gained a reputation for degrees geared towards practical training and industry experience, and its law degree is no exception. With core subjects such as Civil Litigation that incorporate skills-based assessment such as negotiations, and a unique practical legal training program, UTS law students are well equipped with important professional skills by the time they graduate.
All law graduates in NSW are required to undergo a practical legal training course before they can be admitted to practice - but UTS is one of the few universities in Australia to offer an accredited Practical Legal Training (PLT) program that is integrated within the bachelor degree. The PLT program offers UTS students an alternative to undergoing study at the College of Law as most students do upon graduation. Places are limited within the UTS program, and students must pass certain academic subjects to qualify, in addition to completing a practical experience work placement of 16 weeks.

Students who decide not to undergo the PLT program in their final year of study instead have a choice of elective units. This option provides for students who are considering a career in academia rather than legal practice, or who would prefer to gain more specialised knowledge in a particular area of the law through focused subjects.

Law skills competitions form a significant part of the co-curricular program, with the opportunity for all students to participate in mooting, negotiating, client interview and witness examination competitions both internally and against teams from other universities. The faculty also promotes engagement in social justice causes, encouraging involvement in the Brennan Justice and Leadership program. The UTS law student society also offers social events to get to know other students, with a particular focus on integrating first year students. Some older students have reported that the campus culture can sometimes feel a little sparse, perhaps due to the tight city space of the UTS building. Fifth year student Jo comments about the law faculty,

‘spread over several buildings/campuses, there is no real common area to ‘hang out’. The renovation of the Haymarket campus has made it a little more appealing to spend time at uni even when you don’t have classes, but it will take more to shift the overall student culture of coming to uni just for class.’

Rebecca, a student in her final year of studies, reflects on her degree,

‘I think the real benefit of UTS is that its courses include a focus on ‘practicality’ that helps you gain work-ready skills, while providing a strong foundation of legal theory that encourages critical thinking and a ‘global outlook’. Tutors and lecturers really encourage unorthodox thinking and creative solutions. Also, the whole university prides itself on being flexible to suit your lifestyle, which means you can pursue other things while studying. For example, in addition to the fulltime/part time option, they repeat daytime courses in the evening (and record or podcast them). You can fast track elective subjects through intensive summer/winter sessions.’

 

www.law.uts.edu.au/

The University of Western Sydney


Stand-out features:

  • Streamlined teaching format of one seminar (per subject) per week
  • Strong focus on electives, available in final 2 years of degree
  • Emphasis on practical skills, with moot (mock trial) based assessment

2013 ATAR cut-off: 90.00 and above (varies according to combined degree choice).

The UWS law degree is done as a combined degree with one of the following other bachelor degrees: Arts, Communication, Science, Social Science, Business and Commerce, or Business and Commerce (Advanced Business Leadership)

Teaching format: All subjects have 1 x 3 hour seminar per week.

Assessment structure: Most subjects have a mark for participation during seminars (10%), one mid-semester assignment (usually 30-35%), and a final exam that is usually open-book (usually 50-60%).

Subjects and credit points: The university requires students to complete enough subjects to reach a total of 180 credit points in order to graduate from the Bachelor of Laws. Each subject offered in the University of Western Sydney's Bachelor of Law is worth 6 credit points. These subjects are drawn from:

18 compulsory Units (108 credit points made up of the following subjects): Introduction to Law; Torts Law; Law Foundation; Criminal Law; Contracts; Property Law; Professional Responsibility and Legal Ethics; Constitutional Law; Commercial Law; Equity, Trusts and Remedies 1; Equity, Trusts and Remedies 2; Law of Associations; Dispute Resolution and Civil Procedure; Revenue Law; Criminal Procedure and Evidence; and Administrative Law.

12 elective units (72 credit points – though may be less depending on combined degree) chosen  from an extensive list of elective units available can be found herehttp://handbook.uws.edu.au/hbook/course.aspx?course=2537.8

Exchange opportunities: UWS offers student exchanges to 80 different universities around the world, though not all exchange locations are appropriate for law students. However, there may be wider exchange opportunities available through the other degree in a law combined degree program.

Degree Structure: 5 years full-time in conjunction with a second undergraduate degree.

Year 1:
Semester One: Two compulsory law units + two units from other degree
Semester Two: Two compulsory law units + two units from other degree

Year 2:
Semester One: One compulsory law unit + three units from other degree
Semester Two: One compulsory law unit + three units from other degree

Year 3:
Semester One: One compulsory law unit + three units from other degree
Semester Two: One compulsory law unit + three units from other degree

Year 4:
Semester One: One compulsory law unit + three elective law units
Semester Two: One compulsory law unit + three elective law units

Year 5:
Semester One: One compulsory law unit + three elective law units
Semester Two: One compulsory law unit + three elective law units

Degree overview: The Bachelor of Laws at the University of Western Sydney can be distinguished by its significant practical focus and a teaching style that prioritizes smaller class sizes and interactive learning. Deviating from the traditional university teaching format of large lectures and smaller tutorial groups, most law subjects at UWS are taught with a single, three-hour long seminar. With around 20 to 30 students in each seminar, there is ample opportunity for students to ask questions and seek individual guidance.

Another unique feature of the course is the huge emphasis on mooting, an important practical skill for any practicing lawyer. In the first, second and third years of the degree, all law subjects are assessed on a practical basis, in addition to written exams and/or assignments, which require students to participate in a moot or mock-trial. In the final two years of the degree, practical assessments are a less prevalent but still important component of assessment. Fourth year student Adam was surprised that

‘from first year a number of law subjects include Moots and applications to the court as assessment tasks and these are undertaken in the Moot Court.’

While smaller class sizes give students a good opportunity to meet peers and form friendships, some students have noticed a lack of campus culture within the law faculty, perhaps owing to the absence of any formal student law society. Fourth year student Anna observes that

‘there are some social events such as an annual Law Ball and cocktail events, however apart from that there are not really any other organised activities. Depending on the subject and year there may be small social gatherings and events but it is up to the students to organise them.’

www.uws.edu.au/law


University of Notre Dame


Stand-out features:

  • Available to undergraduates as a stand-alone degree
  • Strong emphasis on legal ethics and social justice
  • Strong focus on practical legal skills

2013 ATAR cut-off: 90.00 (since Notre Dame is not a member of UAC, this cut-off is indicative of a minimum ATAR only; admission may also be based on Notre Dame application form and a subsequent interview with the student)

Degree structure: Four years full-time as a stand-alone degree; 5 years full-time as a combined degree. Notre Dame core units (18 credit points) + Law core units (132 credit points) + Law Elective units (42 credit points) = 192 credit points

Can be combined with: Arts, Commerce.

Subjects and credit points: The university requires students to complete enough subjects to reach a total of 174 credit points in order to graduate from the Bachelor of Laws. The number of credit points allocated to subjects offered in the University of Notre Dame's Bachelor of Law varies between subjects. These subjects are drawn from:

Compulsory units (132 credit points made up of the following): Legal Research and Writing; Legal Process; Legal History; Criminal Law A&B; Contemporary Legal Issues; Principles of Contract Law A&B; Principles of Torts A&B; Property Law A&B; Principles of Equity and the Law of Trusts; Advocacy; Administrative Law A&B; Evidence A&B; Constitutional Law A&B; Corporations and Partnerships; Commercial Practice and Ethics; Civil Procedure A&B; Remedies; International and Comparative Law; Legal Philosophy; and Alternative Dispute Resolution.

Elective units (42 credit points chosen from the following, [subject to seasonal change]): Health law; Mining and Petroleum Law; Trade Practices Law; Employee Relations Law; Family Law; Intellectual Property Law; Human Rights Law; Indigenous Law; Insolvency; Succession; Bioethics and the Law; Corporations and Partnerships; Occupational Safety and Health Law; Environmental Law; Construction and Building Contract law; Entertainment Law; Introduction to Canon Law; Law and Religion; Law of Corporate Finance; Personal Taxation Law; Law in Context (Externships); Law Review; Advanced Research Project; Directed Research Project.

Exchange opportunities: USA, Europe, Asia.

Degree Overview: The Bachelor of Laws at the University of Notre Dame is unique for its acceptance of undergraduate students into a stand-alone law degree, without the requirement of most other Sydney law schools that students undergo a combined degree. The degree places emphasis on ethics, practical legal applications, professional skills and the concepts of duty, social justice and service to others. As a Catholic institution, students university-wide are required to undergo core Notre Dame units in Philosophy, Ethics and Theology.

Our friends at Notre Dame must either be very busy studying or taking advantage of student discounts at local eateries, because they didn’t get back to us before this article went live! Watch this space for info straight from the horse’s mouth about what law students at Notre Dame like best about their degree… and in the meantime, check out the degree profile here.

You can also visit the Notre Dame Sydney Law website here: www.nd.edu.au/sydney/schools/law/lawsydney.shtml

 

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